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2021-01-18 DfT-001
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Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer travel guidance for passengers


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Department for Transport

Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer travel guidance for passengers
_______________________________________________________________


date
18 January 2021
source Department for Transport
type Guidance



Walking, cycling, and travelling in vehicles or on public transport during the coronavirus outbreak.

Published 12 May 2020
Last updated 18 January 2021 — see all updates

Applies to: England

Contents
National lockdown
Travel safely during the coronavirus outbreak
Social distancing
Social contact
Face coverings
Walking and cycling
Private cars and other vehicles
Public transport
Taxis and private hire vehicles
Aviation, ferries and maritime transport
Travelling abroad
Before travelling to the UK
Passenger locator form
Coronavirus testing
Travelling from England to other UK nations
Exemptions – people who do not have to wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs
Checklists for safer travel
Guidance for transport operators
Print this page
National lockdown
National lockdown applies in England.

The rules are different in the other UK nations. You should check the rules that apply if you plan to travel to any other part of the UK:

o Northern Ireland
o Scotland
o Wales

You must not leave your home unless you have a reasonable excuse (for example, for work or to attend a medical appointment). If you need to travel, you should stay local – meaning avoiding travelling outside of your village, town or the part of a city where you live – and look to reduce the number of journeys you make overall. The list of reasons you can leave your home include, but are not limited to:

o work, where you cannot reasonably work from home
o accessing education and for caring responsibilities
o visiting those in your support bubble – or your childcare bubble for childcare
o visiting hospital, GP and other medical appointments or visits where you have had an accident or are concerned about your health
o buying goods or services that you need, but this should be within your local area wherever possible
o outdoor exercise – this should be done locally wherever possible, but you can travel a short distance within your area to do so if necessary (for example, to access an open space)
o attending the care and exercise of an animal, or veterinary services
o attending communal worship and life events, including weddings and funerals

If you need to travel, walk or cycle where possible, and plan ahead to avoid busy times and routes on public transport. This will allow you to practise social distancing while you travel.

Car sharing is not permitted with anyone from outside your household or support bubble unless your journey is undertaken for an exempt reason. See the guidance on car sharing.

If you need to use public transport, you should follow the public transport guidance.

You must not travel at all if you:

o have been told by the NHS Test and Trace service to self-isolate
o are experiencing any coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms
o are self-isolating as a result of COVID-19 symptoms or sharing a household or support bubble with somebody with symptoms

Staying away from home overnight
You cannot leave your place of residence to go for holidays or overnight stays unless you have a reasonable excuse for doing so. This means that holidays in the UK and abroad are not allowed.

This includes staying in a second home or caravan, if that is not your primary residence. This also includes staying with anyone who you don’t live with unless they’re in your support bubble.

You are allowed to stay overnight away from your home if a legally permitted reason applies, including if you:

o are visiting your support bubble
o are unable to return to your main residence
o need accommodation while moving house
o need accommodation to attend a funeral or related commemorative event
o require accommodation for work purposes or to provide voluntary services
o are a child requiring accommodation for school or care
o are homeless, seeking asylum, a vulnerable person seeking refuge, or if escaping harm (including domestic abuse)
o are an elite athlete or their support staff or parent, if the athlete is under 18, and it is necessary to be outside of the home for training or competition

Travel safely during the coronavirus outbreak

It is against the law to leave your home to travel unless for work or other legally permitted reasons. If you need to travel you should stay local – meaning avoiding travelling outside of your village, town or the part of a city where you live – and look to reduce the number of journeys you make overall.

You can help control COVID-19 and travel safely by walking and cycling, if you can. Where this is not possible, use public transport or drive.

You can also help control COVID-19 by:

o working from home where possible
o observing social contact rules
o keeping your distance when you travel, where possible
o washing or sanitising your hands regularly
o planning ahead and avoiding the busiest routes, as well as busy times like the rush hour
o downloading the NHS COVID-19 app before you travel, if possible, and checking in where you see official NHS COVID-19 QR code posters

These restrictions apply to England only. The rules are different in the other UK nations:

o Northern Ireland
o Scotland
o Wales

Social distancing

You should stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings).

Help keep yourself, other passengers and transport staff safe by taking the following precautions:

o limit the number of people or households that you come into contact with, for example by avoiding the busiest routes, as well as busy times like the rush hour
o wash or sanitise your hands regularly
o avoid touching your face
o cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of your elbow when coughing or sneezing
o travel side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
o only touch surfaces where required for safe travel
o stay outdoors, rather than indoors, where possible
o minimise the time spent close to other people, where possible
o avoid loud talking, shouting or singing
o dispose of waste safely, including items such as used disposable face coverings

You must wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England unless you are exempt.

Social contact

When travelling on public transport, aircraft, taxis, private hire vehicles, coaches, ferries or other maritime vessels, you must not gather with others outside of your household or support bubble.

There are some activities for which individuals are still permitted to travel in groups that do not otherwise conform to the requirements of the social contact rules. This is only where travel is reasonably necessary in order to carry out a specific activity, including:

o with work, for example, transport organised by an employer during the course of your work
o providing support to a vulnerable person
o providing emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness or to escape risk of harm
o making arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents or guardians
o training or competition, where the person concerned is an elite sportsperson
o where fulfilling a legal obligation such as attending court or jury service

The police will be able to take action against those who break these rules, including asking people to disperse and issuing a fixed penalty notice of £200 for the first offence.

People aged 18 or over can be fined:

o £200 for the first offence, lowered to £100 if paid within 14 days
o £400 for the second offence, then doubling for each further offence up to a maximum of £6,400

The rules for social contact are different in the other UK nations:

o social contact in Northern Ireland
o social contact in Scotland
o social contact in Wales

Face coverings

A face covering is a covering of any type which covers your nose and mouth. Surgical masks or respirators used by healthcare and other workers as part of personal protective equipment (PPE) should continue to be reserved for people who need to wear them at work.

Face coverings are not a substitute for maintaining social distancing and good hand hygiene.

How to wear and make a face covering.

Where you must wear face coverings
It is the law that you must wear a face covering when travelling in England on public transport. Such as, on or in a:

o bus or coach
o train or tram
o ferry or hovercraft or other vessel
o taxi or private hire vehicle
o aircraft
o cable car

You must also wear a face covering in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs from which passenger services operate. Such as:

o airports
o rail stations and terminals
o the Channel Tunnel terminal in Kent
o ports and terminals
o bus, coach and tram stations and terminals

You must also wear a face covering in other indoor settings.

If you do not wear a face covering in these settings you will be breaking the law and could be fined. The fine for a first offence is £200, or £100 if you pay the fine within 14 days.

Repeat offenders receiving fines either on public transport or in an indoor place will have their fines doubled on each subsequent offence up to a maximum value of £6,400. After the first offence, there will be no discount. As an example, receiving a second fine will amount to £400 and a third fine will be £800. A sixth fine and all subsequent fines will be £6,400.

These laws apply while you are in England. If travelling from any other UK nation, you will be required to wear a face covering when you enter England, regardless of the rules in the nation you are transiting from.

Other areas you should wear a face covering
You must also wear a face covering by law in some other public places, unless you have a face covering exemption because of your age or health, or if you have a legitimate reason not to.

You are strongly encouraged to also wear a face covering in other enclosed spaces where it is difficult to maintain social distancing, or where there are people you do not normally meet.

The rules for wearing face coverings are different in the other UK nations:

o face coverings in Northern Ireland
o face coverings in Scotland
o face coverings in Wales

Face covering exemptions

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering including for health, age or disability reasons.

Government and some operators have produced cards and badges which you can choose to wear to show you are exempt. There is no requirement to do this though, and if you rely on an exemption, transport staff should not ordinarily ask for evidence.

Some transport staff may also not wear a face covering if it is not required for their job.

When you can remove your face covering
You should remove your face covering if asked to do so by a police officer or other relevant person.

You do not need to wear a face covering if you have a legitimate reason not to.

Within the public area of a transport hub, passengers are able to remove their face covering in order to eat and drink when seated. They must put their face covering back on once they finish eating or drinking.

It is important to wash or sanitise your hands before and after touching your face covering. For longer journeys, take more than one face covering and a plastic bag for used face coverings.

Please be mindful that the wearing of a face covering may inhibit communication with people who rely on lip reading, facial expressions and clear sound.

Disposing of used face coverings

Use a ‘black bag’ waste bin or litter bin to dispose of face coverings. You should not put face coverings in a recycling bin or drop them as litter.

Walking and cycling

It is against the law to leave your home to travel unless for work or other legally permitted reasons.

Where you need to travel, walk or?cycle?if you can. This will reduce pressure on public transport and the road network.

You should stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings).

Your local council can help you plan your journey by providing maps showing dedicated paths and routes.

You must observe social contact rules while walking or cycling in England.

Where possible,?keep a suitable distance from other people. For example, when waiting at crossings and traffic lights. Take precautions where this is not possible.

Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands before and after cycling.

Consider making a list of items to take with you.

Private cars and other vehicles

Plan your journey

It is against the law to leave your home to travel unless for work or other legally permitted reasons.

You may rent a car or other vehicle for travel where the vehicle is being used for the above reasons.

Plan your route, including any breaks, before setting out.

Download the NHS COVID-19 app, if possible.

Check that your vehicle is safe and roadworthy if you haven’t used it for several weeks.

People from a household or support bubble can travel together in a vehicle.

You should wear a face covering in an enclosed space where social distancing isn’t possible and where you will come into contact with people outside your household or support bubble. Take care to use face coverings properly.

Consider making a list of items to take with you.

Car sharing

National lockdown applies in England.

There are also guidelines for travelling in taxis and private hire vehicles.

It is against the law to leave your home to travel unless for work or other legally permitted reasons.

Car sharing is not permitted with someone from outside your household or your support bubble unless your journey is undertaken for an exempt reason. For example, if car sharing is reasonably necessary as part of your work.

It is difficult to socially distance during car journeys. Where it is essential to car share, you can reduce the risk of transmission by:

o sharing the transport with the same people each time
o minimising the group size at any one time
o opening windows for ventilation
o travelling side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
o facing away from each other
o considering seating arrangements to maximise distance between people in the vehicle
o cleaning your car between journeys using standard cleaning products – make sure you clean door handles and other areas that people may touch
o asking the driver and passengers to wear a face covering

On your journey

Expect more pedestrians and cyclists, especially at peak times of day. Where possible, allow other road users to maintain social distancing. For example, give cyclists space at traffic lights.

At garages, petrol stations and motorway services, try to keep your distance from other people and, if possible, pay by contactless. Follow guidance on the use of face coverings. Where possible, check in using the NHS COVID-19 app if you enter a venue that has an official NHS COVID-19 QR code poster at the entrance. Alternatively, you can provide your contact details.

Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands often, and always when exiting or re-entering your vehicle.

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey, wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible.

Public transport

You can continue using the public transport network if you need to travel for an exempt reason.

You must wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England. You will be breaking the law if you fail to do so and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or disability reasons.

You should remove your face covering if asked to do so by a police officer or other relevant person.

It is important to wash or sanitise your hands before and after touching your face covering.

If you need to dispose of your face covering, use ‘black bag’ waste bins or litter bins. You should not use a recycling bin.

Plan your journey

Before and during your journey, check with your transport operator for the latest travel advice on your route:

o bus, coach, tram and ferry operators
o National Rail
o TfL

Travel may take longer than normal on some routes due to social distancing measures. Allow more time if your journey involves changes between different forms of transport.

If you can:

o travel at off-peak times
o use quieter stations and stops – get off a stop early if it’s less busy
o keep changes to a minimum, for example, between bus and train
o walk for more of your journey, for example, the first or last mile
o book your tickets online in advance or pay by contactless
o download the NHS COVID-19 app before travelling

Consider making a list of items to take with you and minimise the luggage you take.

On your journey

You must wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England. You will be breaking the law if you fail to do so and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or disability reasons.

You should stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings).

Help keep yourself, other passengers and transport staff safe by observing the following precautions:

o ensure you maintain social distancing, where possible, including at busy entrances, exits, under canopies, bus stops, platforms or outside of stations
o limit the number of people that you come into contact with, for example, avoid travelling during peak hours
o wash or sanitise your hands regularly
o avoid touching your face
o cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of your elbow when coughing or sneezing
o travel side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
o touch as few surfaces as possible
o stay outdoors, rather than indoors, where possible
o minimise the time spent close to other people, where possible
o avoid loud talking, shouting or singing
o dispose of waste safely, including items such as used disposable face coverings
o be prepared to queue or take a different entrance or exit at stations
o wait for passengers to get off first before you board
o wait for the next service if you cannot safely keep your distance on board a train, bus or coach
o avoid consuming food and drink on public transport, where possible
o respect other people’s space while travelling
o be aware of pregnant, older and disabled people who may require a seat or extra space
o be aware that not all disability is visible and some people may be exempt from wearing a face covering
o where possible, check in using the NHS COVID-19 app if you enter a venue that has an official NHS COVID-19 QR code poster at the entrance – alternatively, you can provide your contact details

Treat transport staff with respect and follow instructions from your transport operator. This may include:

o notices about which seats to use or how to queue
o additional screens, barriers or floor markings
o requests to board through different doors or to move to less busy areas

Transport support services for disabled people

All transport support services for disabled people are still available. You can contact providers in advance to understand the COVID-secure measures they have put in place to keep you safe on your journey. For more information, check your rights as a disabled passenger before you travel.

Seek assistance if you need it

If you require assistance when travelling, contact your transport operator as you would normally do.

If any problems arise or you feel ill during your journey, speak to a member of transport staff. In the case of an emergency, contact the emergency services as you normally would.

If you need help, try to keep a suitable distance from members of staff. If this isn’t possible, try to avoid physical contact and keep the time you spend near staff as short as possible.

Children

Where travel is necessary, consider whether children could walk or cycle, accompanied by a responsible adult or carer, where appropriate.

Children in England must also observe social contact rules in some cases.

Social distancing applies to children as well as adults. Children should keep their distance from people who are not in their household or support bubble while on public transport and in enclosed or substantially enclosed public areas of transport hubs.

If this isn’t possible, children should:

o avoid physical contact
o face away from others
o keep the time spent near others as short as possible

Children under the age of 3 should not wear face coverings. Children aged from 3 to 10 can wear face coverings, but they are not required to.

If you are the responsible adult or carer travelling with children, please help them:

o minimise the surfaces they touch
o maintain their distance from others
o wear their face covering
o wash their hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible after the end of your journey

Where relevant, consider travel guidance for educational settings.

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey:

o consider walking or cycling from the station or stop you arrived at
o wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible – do the same for children who have travelled with you

Taxis and private hire vehicles

National lockdown applies in England.

It is against the law to leave your home to travel unless for work or other legally permitted reasons.

If you are leaving your home to travel for a legally permitted reason, you must also note that, aside from the driver, it is not permitted to share a taxi or private hire vehicle with someone from outside your household or your support bubble unless doing so is itself necessary for an exempt reason, for example, if it is reasonably necessary as part of your work.

You must wear a face covering when using taxis or private hire vehicles. You will be breaking the law if you fail to do so and could be fined. A taxi driver or private hire vehicle operator will be entitled to refuse to accept you if you do not wear a face covering, unless you are exempt from this requirement.

You should stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings).

Follow the advice of the operator and driver. For example, you may be asked to sit in the back left-hand seat if travelling alone. You may want to check with your taxi or private hire operator before travelling if they have put any additional measures in place.

You should use contactless payment if possible, or find out if you can pay online in advance.

Be aware of the surfaces you touch. Be careful not to touch your face. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of your elbow when coughing or sneezing.

When finishing your journey, wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible.

Aviation, ferries and maritime transport

National lockdown applies in England.

You must wear a face covering when travelling on a ferry, hovercraft (or other passenger vessel) or aircraft in England.

This applies:

o in airspace over England, when you are on board an aircraft that took off from, or is to land at, a place in England
o in the English territorial sea, when you are on board a vessel that departed from, or is to dock at, a place in England

You must also wear a face covering at airports, as well as at ports and terminals used by vessels providing a public transport service.

If you do not wear a face covering in these settings, you will be breaking the law and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or disability reasons.

It is important to wash or sanitise your hands before and after touching your face covering.

Download the NHS COVID-19 app, if possible.

Plan your journey

Before you travel, check with your travel operator and port, or airline and airport for the latest travel advice on your route.

There is specific guidance for passengers in airports and on aircraft.

Consider making a list of items to take with you.

On your journey

You should stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings).

Be aware of the surfaces you touch. Be careful not to touch your face. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of your elbow when coughing or sneezing.

Be considerate to your fellow passengers and to transport staff:

o do not congregate near entrances or exits while waiting
o be aware of pregnant, older and disabled people who may require a seat or extra space
o be aware that not all disability is visible and some people may be exempt from wearing a face covering

Treat transport staff with respect and follow instructions from your transport operator. This may include:

o notices about which seats to use or how to queue
o additional screens, barriers or floor markings
o requests to board through different doors or to move to less busy areas

Where possible, check in using the NHS COVID-19 app if you enter a venue that has an official NHS COVID-19 QR code poster at the entrance. Alternatively, you can provide your contact details.

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey, wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible.

Travelling abroad

You can only travel internationally – or within the UK – where you have a legally permitted reason to leave home. In addition, you should consider the public health advice in the country you are visiting.

If you do need to travel overseas (and are legally permitted to do so, for example, because it is for work), even if you are returning to a place you’ve visited before, you should look at the rules in place at your destination and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) travel advice.

Foreign nationals are subject to the ‘Stay at Home’ regulations. You should not travel abroad unless it is permitted. This means you must not go on holiday.

If you are visiting the UK, you may return home. You should check whether there are any restrictions in place at your destination.

Entry restrictions

There are restrictions in place on travel to some countries and what you can do when you are there. For example, you may need proof of a negative COVID-19 test to travel to some countries.

Before you travel, you should:

o check government travel advice for the latest information on COVID-19 entry requirements and travel warnings for the country you are travelling to
o make sure you understand the restrictions on re-entering the UK

Also read the following guidance:

o guidance for British citizens travelling abroad
o guidance for passengers in airports and on aircraft

Check your specific plans with your airline, ferry, train operator and accommodation provider. During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover.

Your transport provider may put measures in place to help you follow the public health guidance of the destination country.

Before travelling to the UK

Passenger locator form

Before you travel to the UK you must complete a passenger locator form.

This applies to people entering the UK from all countries and territories. It applies to UK residents and visitors.

You can submit the form any time in the 48 hours before you arrive in the UK.

The form is an online form. You will need an internet connection and details of your journey to complete it. Make sure you leave yourself enough time to complete it to reduce delays at the border.

Failure to complete the form is a criminal offence.

Coronavirus testing

You must have proof of a negative coronavirus (COVID-19) test to travel to the UK.

You must take the test in the 3 days before you start your journey.

You will need to present valid proof of your negative test before you board to travel to the UK.

If you don’t present proof of a negative test result certificate, you may not be able to board your transport to the UK.

Find out more about:

o coronavirus testing for people travelling to England
o coronavirus testing for people travelling to Scotland
o coronavirus testing for people travelling to Wales

Exemptions from passenger locator form or coronavirus testing

There are a small number of people who don’t have to complete the passenger locator form or show proof of a negative coronavirus test, because of their jobs.

People on domestic flights and people arriving from Ireland, the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands also don’t have to complete the form.

On arrival in the UK

On arriving in the UK, you must comply with border and immigration requirements.

At the UK border you may be required to show:

o proof of a completed passenger locator form
o proof of a negative coronavirus test result

This applies to people entering the UK from all countries and territories. It applies to UK residents and visitors.

You will need to self-isolate for 10 days on your arrival in the UK.

You should leave the port, airport or station as quickly as possible. Access to ports or airports may be limited to passengers, crew members and staff.

Non-passengers should only enter airports where needed. For example, accompanying or picking up a passenger requiring assistance or unaccompanied children.

You must observe any relevant restrictions upon your arrival in the UK. The rules for social contact and other restrictions vary in each UK nation:

o England
o Northern Ireland
o Scotland
o Wales

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey:

o follow all relevant guidance
o wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible

Travelling from England to other UK nations

Before you travel from England to Northern Ireland, Scotland or Wales, you should check that:

o the activity you are travelling for is permitted in the country you plan to visit
o you are permitted to stay overnight, if you need to do so
o your trip respects each nation’s social contact rules

Read the guidance for:

o Northern Ireland
o Scotland
o Wales

Exemptions – people who do not have to wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs

The requirement to wear a face covering does not apply to:

o a child under the age of 11
o passengers in an allocated cabin, berth or other similar accommodation, when they are alone or with members of their household or support bubble
o passengers who remain in their private vehicle while on board public transport, for example on a car ferry
o a person who enters or is within a transport hub in a vehicle (other than a vehicle being used for the provision of a public transport service)
o an employee of the transport hub or the relevant public transport operator, when they are acting in the course of their employment
o any other person providing services to the transport hub or public transport operator, under arrangements made with the transport hub or transport operator, who is providing those services
o a constable or police community support officer acting in the course of their duty
o an emergency responder such as a paramedic or fire officer acting in the course of their duty
o an official, for example a border force officer, acting in the course of their duties

Legitimate reasons not to wear a face covering

You also do not need to wear a face covering if you have a legitimate reason not to. This includes:

o if you have a physical or mental illness or impairment, or a disability that means you cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering
o if putting on, wearing or removing a face covering would cause you severe distress
o if you are travelling with, or providing help to, someone who relies on lip reading to communicate
o if you are travelling to avoid injury or escape the risk of harm, and you do not have a face covering with you
o if you need to remove it during your journey to avoid harm or injury or the risk of harm or injury to yourself or others
o if you need to eat, drink, or take medication on public transport
o if you are asked to remove your face covering by a police officer or other official, for example to check your railcard
o in other situations set out in further government face covering guidance

Enforcement of face coverings on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs

You are not allowed to get on public transport or enter substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs if you are not wearing a face covering, unless you have an exemption or a legitimate reason for not wearing one. Transport staff may tell you not to board or ask you to get off.

If you refuse to wear a face covering, you can receive a fine from the police or Transport for London enforcement officers. The fixed penalty notice will require you to pay £200, which is reduced to £100 if paid within 14 days.

Repeat offenders receiving fines either on public transport or in an indoor place will have their fines doubled on each subsequent offence up to a maximum value of £6,400. After the first offence, there will be no discount. As an example, receiving a second fine will amount to £400 and a third fine will be £800. A sixth fine and all subsequent fines will be £6,400.

Checklists for safer travel

Plan your journey

o can you walk or cycle to your destination?
o have you checked the latest travel advice from your transport operator?
o have you booked your travel ticket online, bought a pass or checked if contactless payment is possible?
o have you planned your journey to minimise crowded areas and allow for delays?
o are you taking the most direct route to your destination?
o have you downloaded the NHS COVID-19 app, if you have a smartphone?

What to take with you

o a face covering – for longer journeys, take more than one face covering and a plastic bag for used face coverings
o a plan for the journey
o tickets, contactless payment card or pass
o phone, if needed for travel updates, tickets, contactless payments
o hand sanitiser
o essential medicines
o tissues

Guidance for transport operators

[Coronavirus (COVID-19): safer transport guidance for operators]


Railhub Archive ::: 2021-01-18 DfT-001





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